Understanding ROR1

ROR1, an oncogene recently discovered on chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) B cells, is being studied by researchers as a potential target for CLL treatment. Dr. Brian Koffman met with Dr. Thomas Kipps, who is researching ROR1, at the 2014 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) meeting to discuss this oncogene and its potential use in treating CLL.

Click HERE: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zji6Fux_WGo

Thanks to Patient Power!fig1

 

Hot on the ROR1 t(r)ail

ROR1 can interact with TCL1 and enhance leukemogenesis in Eμ-TCL1 transgenic mice.

Receptor tyrosine kinase-like orphan receptor 1 (ROR1) is an oncoembryonic antigen found on chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) B cells, but not on normal adult tissues. We generated transgenic (Tg) mice with human ROR1 regulated by the murine Ig promoter/enhancer. In contrast to nontransgenic littermates, such animals had B-cell-restricted expression of ROR1 and could develop clonal expansions of ROR1(bright)CD5(+)B220(low) B cells resembling human CLL at ≥ 15 mo of age. Because immune-precipitation and mass spectrometry studies revealed that ROR1 could complex with T-cell leukemia 1 (TCL1) in CLL, we crossed these animals with Eµ-TCL1-Tg (TCL1) mice. Progeny with both transgenes (ROR1 × TCL1) developed CD5(+)B220(low) B-cell lymphocytosis and leukemia at a significantly younger median age than did littermates with either transgene alone. ROR1 × TCL1 leukemia B cells had higher levels of phospho-AKT than TCL1 leukemia cells and expressed high levels of human ROR1, which we also found complexed with TCL1.

Transcriptome analyses revealed that ROR1 × TCL1 leukemia cells had higher expression of subnetworks implicated in embryonic and tumor-cell proliferation, but lower expression of subnetworks involved in cell-cell adhesion or cell death than did TCL1 leukemia cells. ROR1 × TCL1 leukemia cells also had higher proportions of Ki-67-positive cells, lower proportions of cells undergoing spontaneous apoptosis, and produced more aggressive disease upon adoptive transfer than TCL1 leukemia cells. However, treatment with an anti-ROR1 mAb resulted in ROR1 down-modulation, reduced phospho-AKT, and impaired engraftment of ROR1 × TCL1 leukemia cells. Our data demonstrate that ROR1 accelerates development/progression of leukemia and may be targeted for therapy of patients with CLL.

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Our New Newsletter is HOT off the Press!

We have our new newsletter is available!!  New news and articles letting you know the latest news in regards to CLL and the Blood Cancer Research Fund. Special thanks to Carolina Bump for her tireless efforts to get this information together!

Click here: Insight – BCRF Winter 2013 Newsletter 

You’re Going Down CLL!!!

New pieces to the puzzle are being identified in the Kipps’ BCRF lab:

(click to see article links)